Welcome Students & Scholars to the Official Website for OUPRC

The 2017 conference will be held at John Carroll University

Download 2017 Membership Letter Here

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The Ohio Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference Consortium is a system of institutions that vigorously encourage and support social science research by undergraduate students. Initiated by John Carroll University in 1987 by Dr. Janet Larsen, OUPRC provides students who are interested in graduate level study, or who are interested in careers in research settings, with the opportunity to present their work to a supportive and constructively critical group of faculty and students.


The conference, a “safe haven” for scholars-in-training to share their research, is traditionally held in mid-April, just before the Midwestern Psychological Association (MPA) conference and provides excellent practice for students continuing on to MPA.  OUPRC Host sites are selected on a rotating basis from member institutions.

This year, M.P.A. begins Thursday, April 20, 2017.  The 31st annual OUPRC will be held here at John Carroll University on Saturday, April 29th.

This Year’s Keynote Speaker: Dr. Thomas Frazier on The Essential Role for Psychology in Translational Team Science

Former Director of the Center for Autism at Cleveland Clinic and Current Chief Science Officer at Autism Speaks

Dr. Frazier is a licensed clinical psychologist who received his B.S. in psychology from John Carroll University in 1997 and his Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 2004. After one year as a visiting assistant professor at John Carroll University, he joined Cleveland Clinic and until recently was the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. On April 1, Dr. Frazier joined Autism Speaks as Chief Science Officer.

Dr. Frazier’s clinical interests include diagnostic evaluation as well the use of intensive behavioral intervention to improve functional outcomes on individuals with autism. In 2008, he re-trained in the leadership of translational science teams. Since that time, his research focuses on two areas: 1) improving early identification and progress monitoring through development of objective markers of autism, and 2) translational studies of a genetic sub-group of autism associated with germline heterozygous PTEN mutations. His talk will focus on the important role of psychology in translational research teams.